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St Andrew's Church of England Primary School An intelligent heart acquires knowledge and the ear of the wise seeks knowledge. Proverbs 18:15

Family Fun Games

Fun Family Games

 

Post It Note Game - You’ll need a stack of sticky notes and a pen. Write a name of a well-known public figure or character on each note, then pass them around until everyone has one. Without looking, each person should stick their note on their forehead or back. Have everyone mingle, or sit in a circle and take turns asking yes or no questions to discover your assigned identity. (“Am I living?” is a great place to start.) Play until everyone has correctly guessed their identity, or pass out prizes to the people who guess correctly first.

 

How’s Yours? - Pick one person to be “It” and send them from the room. With the people remaining, select a common trait: hair, articles of clothing, or body parts all work. When the person returns, they’ll ask someone, “How’s yours?” That person should then give a one-word adjective to describe their trait. (Itchy, thick, and stretchy all work for shirts, for example.) Repeat until the person asking guesses the trait.

 

Most Likely To - Gather in a circle. Begin with one person asking, “Who’s most likely to trip over their own feet?” (Or another situation, trait, action, etc.) Count down from three (performing a drumroll with your hands is encouraged) and then have everyone point at who they think would be most likely to do said act. Whoever has the most fingers pointed at them is out. Go around the circle asking “Who’s most likely to…” until all but one person is out. You can skip the eliminations to make the game last longer.

 

Would You Rather? - Gather in a circle. Ask the person next to you, “Would you rather…” and include two challenging situations. (“Would you rather not shower for a year or not brush your teeth for a year?” for example.) After their response, it’s their turn to ask the person next to them. Continue until you can’t think of any more scenarios.

 

I’m Hosting a Party… - For a more cognitive game, play this brain-teaser. Say you’re hosting a party, and only people who bring the right contributions are given an invitation. Pick a secret rule: Typically, everyone must bring something that begins with the same letter as their name, but you can also get more creative with it. Don’t tell anyone else your rule.

Go around the room and have each person say what they’re bringing; you respond to each suggestions with a “Yes, you’re invited,” or “No, you can’t bring that.” Continue until everyone figures out the rule.

 

Telephone - An oldie but a goodie: Gather in a circle. Pick one phrase to whisper in the ear of the person next to you—no repeats. That person will whisper what they heard to the person next to them, and so on until the phrase gets back to you. Prepare to laugh at how distorted it gets. To make it more difficult, play music in the background.

 

Spoons - Find a deck of cards and a set of spoons. (Pieces of candy also work.) Have enough for each player, minus one. Deal four cards to each person playing. One person, the dealer, will keep the remaining deck next to them and draw one card at a time. They will look at the card and trade it out for a card in their hand or pass it along to the person next to them, who will do the same thing. The goal is to collect four of the same card; when that happens, reach for a spoon. When someone spots a spoon missing, they, too, can grab one; whoever is left without a spoon at the end is out. Remove one more spoon and play again.

Alternatively, play by sticking out your tongue when you’ve collected four of a kind: If others notice, they can stick out their tongues, too; whoever notices last loses.

 

In a Perfect World - Similar to I’m Hosting a Party and Crossed, Uncrossed, have everyone sit in a circle. Say you’re describing your perfect world: “In my perfect world, there are doors but no windows.” Have the next person describe what might be in your perfect world. Your perfect world has only double letter items: Schools but not universities, for example, or apples but not bananas. If someone gets it right, say, “Yes, that would be in my perfect world.” If they don’t, say so. Continue around the circle until everyone figures it out.

 

Charades - This tried-and-true party game can be as simple or as complicated as you make it. Have everyone write down concepts, movies, people, shows, and more to act out and divide into teams. One person will act out something drawn from the assortment while their team members guess what it is. When time is up, switch teams and repeat. Add time limits, scoring systems, silence rules, and more as desired.

 

20 Questions - Pick one person to go first. That person will think of an item, animal, movie, public figure, etc. Everyone else will ask yes or no questions about what or who they are; they have 20 chances to guess, or the other person wins. Whoever guesses correctly can win a prize, or be the next to answer questions.

 

Medusa - Have everyone sit around a table. Everyone will put their heads down; count down from three, and have everyone sit up and look at someone else in the circle. If you make eye contact with someone else, you’re out. If the person you’re looking at is looking at someone else, you’re safe. Repeat until everyone is out.

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